• SammutS_1

    Dr. Stephen Sammut

    Associate Professor of Psychology

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    Education

    • Ph.D. in Neuroscience, University of Malta (Msida, Malta)
    • B.Pharm, Pharmacy College, Monash University (Parkville, VIC, Australia)

    Professional Experience

    • Post Doctoral Research Associate & Lab Manager, Department of Neuroscience (Lab PI: Dr. AR. West), Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science (North Chicago, IL 60064)

    Technique Experience

    • Voltammetry/Amperometry
    • Electrophysiology
    • Behavioral Experiments
    • Behavioral Models
    • Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    Professional Memberships

    • Society for Neuroscience (SFN)
    • Fellowship of Catholic Scholars
    • Society of Catholic Social Scientists
    • American Association of Pro-Life Obstetricians and Gynecologists (AAPLOG)
    • World Expert Consortium for Abortion Research and Education (WECARE)

      Research Interests

      Animal models of disease remain crucial as a tool in science, helping us understand the mechanisms behind various human diseases by attempting to imitate to the best of our ability the pathologies of interest. In psychology (and relatedsciences), such models of disease are utilized to investigate the physiological mechanisms involved in psychiatric disorders. It is our goal to utilize such behavioral modeling of psychiatric disorders such as depression, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and drug abuse to investigate the neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to dysfunctional behavior.

      Select Publications & Accomplishments

      Publications list
      • The Prevalence and Correlates of Depression, Anxiety, and Stress in a Sample of College Students. Journal of Affective Disorders.
        Beiter R, Nash R, McCrady M, Rhoades D, Linscomb M, Clarahan M, Sammut S. (2015) The Prevalence and Correlates of Depression, Anxiety, and Stress in a Sample of College Students. Journal of Affective Disorders 173, 90-96.(published online 11/18/2014; doi:10.1016/j.jad.2014.10.054)
      • Inhibition of Striatal Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase-cGMP Signaling Reverses Basal Ganglia Dysfunction and Akinesia in Experimental Parkinsonism. PLoS ONE 
        Tseng KY, Caballero A, Dec A, Cass DK, Simak N, Sunu E, Park MJ, Blume SR, Sammut S, Park DJ, West AR. (2011) Inhibition of Striatal Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase-cGMP Signaling Reverses Basal Ganglia Dysfunction and Akinesia in Experimental Parkinsonism PLoS ONE 6(11): e27187. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0027187

      • Nitric oxide-soluble guanylyl cyclase signaling regulates corticostriatal transmission and short-term synaptic plasticity of striatal projection neurons recorded in vivo. Neuropha 
        Sammut, S., Threlfell, S., and West, A.R. (2010) Nitric oxide-soluble guanylyl cyclase signaling regulates corticostriatal transmission and short-term synaptic plasticity of striatal projection neurons recorded in vivo. Neuropharmacology; 58(3):624-631

      • Inhibition of phosphodiesterase 10A increases the responsiveness of striatal projection neurons to stimulation of frontal cortical afferents. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 
        Threlfell S., Sammut S., Menniti, F.S., Schmidt, C.J., West, AR. (2009) Inhibition of phosphodiesterase 10A increases the responsiveness of striatal projection neurons to stimulation of frontal cortical afferents. J Pharmacol Exp Ther.; 328:785-795

      • Acute cocaine administration increases NO efflux in the rat prefrontal cortex via a neuronal NOS-dependent mechanism. Synapse 
        Sammut S. & West AR. (2008). Acute cocaine administration increases NO efflux in the rat prefrontal cortex via a neuronal NOS-dependent mechanism. Synapse Sep; 62(9):710-3